superbia

            april 19 - may 19

Eva Sedgwick-Coward

‘Gateway to Heaven’





Hung up, a canvas sculpture exploring the sexualisation of the feminine leg, focusing particularly on the influence of the negative space.

There is a certain power in our legs which is much more than the ability to move. There is often an undesired attention which comes with this power. The sexualisation of the feminine leg is deeply embedded in our society – it has infiltrated the social dress code and unfortunately is often used in the foundations of blame culture. There are numerous responses to the question why the feminine leg has been sexualised, but one primary one being it is where they lead to.



Our legs are sexualised, and often the objects of fetishes, as they lead to our genitals, an intimate area of our bodies which is often kept private. The sexualisation of the feminine leg is a breach of this privacy and it is so unwelcomingly and unavoidably projected onto a body part which should, in my opinion, be seen as only the supporting tool it is.





“It’s that sexual excitement via association” (Plaud, 2009)















Whilst working on these pieces, Eva Sedgwick-Coward and Ripley Fletcher collaborated on another piece for the exhibition.
This can be viewed here.
One piece depicting legs and the other representing the negative space, they hang in a delicate harmony. The larger piece faintly coloured on top to remind us what is in between them. The smaller canvas piece has been segregated and exposed, encasing the vulnerability we often feel with the exposure of our legs. Whilst the canvas piece behind sits still, the piece in the front vibrates and twists as it tries to fit into the void it has left, but can’t.’

Large piece 73 x 51cm / Small piece 50 x 23cm / Canvas / 2021

Eva Sedgwick-Coward, Gateway to Heaven
Email: e.sedgwick-coward0320201@arts.ac.uk

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